Month: February 2019

ike Lee jumps in the arms of Actor Samuel L. Jackson as

  Marvel’s “Black Panther” looked like a contender by claiming a pair of early awards, and made

history in the process: Ruth E. Carter and Hannah Beachler became the first African-American w

omen to win for costume design and production design, respectively. The film was also honored for its musical score.

  ”Roma” didn’t walk away empty handed, earing best foreig

n-language film. Its director, Alfonso Cuaron, was honored for directing and cin

ematography for the black-and-white period drama, a deeply personal look back at the women who raised him.

  Cuaron’s marks the fifth time a Mexican director has won that

award in the past six years, a stretch that includes his previous win for “Gravity” in 2014.

  Guillermo Del Toro — who presented the statuette to Cuaron — was t

he victor last year for “The Shape of Water.” The third member of the “Three Amigos,” as the

y are affectionately known, is Alejandro G. Iñárritu, a winner for “Birdman” and “The Revenant.”

  Mahershala Ali received his second Oscar in three years for “Green Book,” and the film al

so won for original screenplay, despite separate controversies related to its director and w

riter. With his prior award for “Moonlight,” Ali becomes only the second African-American actor with multiple Os

cars, joining Denzel Washington. A tearful Regina King took the first award of the night, winning supporting actress f

or “If Beale Street Could Talk,” director Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of the James Baldwin novel.

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Beyond “Black Panther,” Marvel’s highlights included “Spider

  Man: Into the Spider-Verse” swinging off with best animated movie, as the Sony release topped a pair of Disney sequels, “Ralph

Breaks the Internet” and “Incredibles 2.” “Free Solo,” a hit documentary about daredevil climber Al

ex Honnold, topped the documentary feature category, which also included the Ruth Bader Ginsburg biography “RBG.” In th

eir enthusiasm, one of the filmmakers blurted out an expletive that was promptly bleeped.

  ”Bohemian Rhapsody’s” other wins came in both sound categories as

well editing. Notably, none of the “Rhapsody” winners thanked credited director, Bryan Si

nger, who was accused of sexual abuse in January, allegations that the filmmaker has denied.

  In one of the more expected victories, the team that transformed Christian Bale into former Vice Pr

esident Dick Cheney won in makeup/hairstyling for “Vice.” Visual effects, however, were something of a

surprise, going to “First Man,” the moon-landing drama about Neil Armstrong.

  Lacking a host, the producers relied on music and comedy bits to enlive

n the evening, including a duet from “A Star is Born” by Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga — la

ter the winner for best song — which drew a standing ovation from the Hollywood crowd.

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Rudolph, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler introduced Sunday’s

  telecast, following Queen and Adam Lambert’s opening performance of “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Cham

pions.” The “Saturday Night Live” alums riffed off the messy build-up to this year’s awards.

  An abundance of drama surrounded the build-up to this year’s Osca

rs, even before getting around to the nailbiting best-picture finish.

  The contenders reflected the gamut of an evolving movie industry, with “Roma” representing Netflix’s arrival in mo

vies, after the streaming service’s model-bending impact on the TV business.

  On the flip side, “Black Panther” embodied the blockbusters upon which the studios have come to rely, and the th

ird-highest-grossing US release of all time at $700 million, nearly doubling that total worldwide.

  A number of individual nominees registered breakthroughs for women and people of color, only

a few years after lack of diversity among the acting categories birthed the #OscarsSoWhite hashtag.

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Extended talks raise hopes there’s a deal in the offingChi

The extending of the talks between China and the United States to resolve their trade and econo

mic frictions will hopefully give substance to the optimism expressed by both sides that they can reach a deal.

US President Donald Trump, senior US officials, and Vice-Premier Liu He, the special envoy of President Xi Jinping, who is h

eading the Chinese delegation, all expressed the belief on Friday that the two sides have made significant progress to

ward reaching a comprehensive agreement that will put an end to the current trade standoff.

It is to be expected that the discussions at this stage will be the toughest test ye

t for the two teams of negotiators, and their task is not one to be envied. However, the un

scheduled two-day extension to their discussions indicates that tangible headway is being made in their joint effo

rts to find a mutually acceptable way to resolve their differences and put an end to their quarrel.

Given what was said on Friday, it seems the talks have gone more deeply and ext

ensively into the bilateral relationship than either side initially anticipated. As US P

resident Donald Trump observed, “we’re covering things that we didn’t even know we’d be covering.”

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So the fact that the to-and-fro is still in progress this far

down the line highlight that there is a shared desire to secure an accord that delivers on the rapport that has been established — also perhaps beyond both side’s expectations.

But it would be getting ahead of the situation to consider the final push tow

ard a consensus on principled, mutually beneficial cooperation all done and

dusted. That consensus, which President Xi identified as the objectiv

e of the talks when he met with the US negotiators after the previous round of neg

otiations in Beijing, has still not been completed, and probably will not be until the two leaders meet to agree on the final det

ails. But there is no doubt that both sides are aware of how momentous such a consensus would be, beyond the tangible rewards it would offer both cou

ntries. For if the two sides can iron out their core differences by abiding by the principles of mutual respect and m

utual benefit, it would reset their relationship in a way that would bode well for the future.

History in the past four decades shows that the two countries benefit in an all-around wa

y from harmonious trade and economic relations, as they provide the ballast for their relationship.

There is obviously still more work to be done. However, if neither side puts a foot wrong, a deal will finally be signed sooner or later.

aaart.org.cn

Brexit on the brink of being delayed as Cabinet ministers split

  Brexit could be on the brink of being postponed.

  Three senior UK ministers have issued a warning to Theresa May that Britain’s depa

rture from the European Union should be delayed if there is no breakthrough on her deal in the next few days.

  Writing in the UK’s Daily Mail newspaper, cabinet members Amber Rudd, David Gauke and Greg Clark signaled th

ey would support a vote in Parliament to have the Article 50 process extended in order to prevent Britain leaving the EU without a deal.

  ”If there is no breakthrough in the coming week, the balance of opinion in Parliament is cl

ear — that it would be better to seek to extend Article 50 and delay our date of departure rather than cra

sh out of the European Union on March 29,” the trio wrote in the article published Saturday.

  They added that if a parliamentary compromise is not found soon, there won’t be enou

gh time to agree a deal and pass legislation before March 29, the date when Britain is set to exit the bloc.

  The senior ministers’ warning comes just days after three Conservative lawmakers quit the party over what they called The

resa May’s “disastrous” handling of Brexit, and the Conservative party’s shift to the right. They joined eig

ht former members of the opposition Labour party who quit a few days earlier. The former Labour MPs left their party in p

art over its handling of Brexit, but also the wave of anti-Semitism that has engulfed it.

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UK Prime Minister Theresa May has repeatedly rejected exte

  Article 50 — the legal process under which an EU member state can leave — and refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit.

  The UK Parliament is due to debate the divorce again on Wednesday when May is expected to update lawmakers on any pr

ogress made in talks with European counterparts on the divisive issue of the Northern Irish backstop.

  This weekend she will meet European Council President Donald Tusk on the margins of

the EU-League of Arab States Summit in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

  Three Conservative MPs have quit Theresa May’s party over Brexit

  By Eliza Mackintosh, CNN

  Updated 1619 GMT (0019 HKT) February 20, 2019

  Ex-Conservative MPs Heidi Allen, second left, Anna Soubry, center, and Sarah W

ollaston, right, arrive for a press conference in Westminster in London on Wednesday.

  Ex-Conservative MPs Heidi Allen, second left, Anna Soubry, center, and Sarah

Wollaston, right, arrive for a press conference in Westminster in London on Wednesday.

  (CNN)Three lawmakers walked out of UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s Conservative party on Wednesday, joini

ng a new group in Parliament that has blown up the British political landscape in less than three days.

  The trio’s dramatic decision to join a group of eight independent MPs, who split fro

m the opposition Labour Party earlier this week, caused consternation at Westminster. They

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However, a one-hour extension is less time than many

  voters have spent in line to cast their ballots in the crucial election.

  The incumbent, Muhammadu Buhari, 76, is running against 71 other ca

ndidates, but his main challenger is Atiku Abubakar, a 72-year-old business tycoo

n and former vice president. They are both Muslim candidates from the north of the country.

  When Buhari, a former military ruler, was elected in 2015, it wa

s the first peaceful transition of power in Nigeria. He promised to offer a clean sweep of the old

routine, but many have been left disillusioned and angry at the rising levels of inequality and extreme poverty.

  More than 84 million people registered for the vote in Africa’s largest economic p

ower, according to data from the Independent National Electoral Commission.

  Videos have surfaced on social media reportedly showing the burni

ng of ballot papers and disruption of the electoral process in various parts of the country.

www.shlfec.com

The world looks longingly at a post-Trump eraon is CNN’s intern

  If Europe’s leaders, diplomats and security professionals had a vote in the 2020 US presidential elections, it doesn’t see

m likely they’d give it to President Trump. At least, that’s how it seemed at the 2019 Munich Security Conference.

  Hundreds of dignitaries crammed into tight corridors, moving between the modest meeting halls of Munich’s Bayerischer Hof Hotel.

  The event has grown in recent years. As prime ministers and presidents rub shoulders wit

h CEO’s and policy wonks, conversations straddle global differences and attempt to shape the world order.

  Biden says US should remain committed to its allies abroad

  It is an odd, almost old-fashioned mix. It’s rare at global summits these days that repo

rters can mingle with the people they cover and even engage them in casual conversation.

  NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg surprised me, praising my sturdy weather-beating boots and trou

sers. He laughed when I told him he was lucky inside. I was outside, the sun was blazing and, frankly, I was baking.

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The first led to Schalke being awarded a penalty after Ota

  was adjudged to have handled the ball, reversing the referee’s initial decision.

  The near three minute wait for a verdict from VAR caused frustration not only for the players but also supporters inside the stadium.

  A second penalty was then awarded when VAR confirmed the refe

ree’s call to award another penalty, this time for a foul on Salif Sane by Fernandinho.

  ”It’s a penalty. The second one is a penalty too,” Guardiola told BT Sport. “…And the red card can be a red card.

  ”I trust VAR. I have arguments sometimes but not this time. They are both penalties.”

  Senate investigators want to question a Moscow-based American businessman with longsta

nding ties to President Donald Trump after witnesses told them he could shed light on the President’s commercia

l and personal activities in Russia dating back to the 1990s, multiple sources have told CNN.

  The Senate Intelligence Committee, which is probing allegations of Russian interference in

the 2016 elections, has been keen to speak with David Geovanis for several months, the sources say.

  Geovanis helped organize a 1996 trip to Moscow by Trump, who was in the early stages of pursuing what would become a lo

ng-held goal of building a Trump Tower in the Russian capital, according to multiple media reports at the time.

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